150531 Isaiah 6:1-8

Text: Isaiah 6:1-8
Theme: Sing The Song Of The Seraphs

We finally made it. We have come to the end of a long journey that began all the way back in December. It began when an angel announced to a young virgin named Mary that God had chosen her to give birth to the Messiah. That Advent announcement eventually took us to an out of the way village in the foothills of Judea. It was there, in a humble stable in Bethlehem, where God the Father demonstrated his amazing love. God so loved the world that he sent his one and only Son to be our Savior.

We followed Jesus across Judea and Samaria and Galilee. We watched him grow in wisdom and stature. We marveled at his miracles. And we traveled with him along the winding path up to Jerusalem. It was there, on a hill called Calvary, where God's Son demonstrated his amazing love. Jesus died on the cross for the sins of the world and then rose victoriously from the grave on Easter morning.

More recently, we climbed the Mount of Olives and looked up to see Jesus ascend into heaven. But our Savior did not leave this earth without giving his disciples some final instructions. He told them to go back into the city and wait for the gift his Father had promised.

So we went back to Jerusalem with the disciples and waited. It was on Pentecost, ten days later, when the Holy Spirit demonstrated his amazing love. He gave the disciples the ability to speak in foreign tongues. He gave them the power to preach boldly. And on a single day, about three thousand people were baptized and brought to faith.

The festival half of the church year is now over, but that doesn't mean its time to take a vacation from worship until next December. On this Trinity Sunday it is our privilege to give thanks and praise to the Triune God, but we are not the only ones who bow down and worship today.

In our text for this morning, God's holy angels did the exact same thing. Through a vision, God allowed Isaiah to see and hear these six-winged creatures as they called out to one another: "Holy, holy, holy is the LORD Almighty; the whole earth is full of his glory" (3). The angels' song of praise is almost three thousand years old, and yet it lives on as a model for our worship today. And I pray that God will use these inspired words of Isaiah to inspire us to...

Sing the Song of the Seraphs

I. The Triune God is a holy God
II. The Triune God is a merciful God

Read more: 150531 Isaiah 6:1-8

150524 John 14:26-27

Text: John 14:26-27
Theme: Enjoy the Peace Your Risen and Ascended Savior Gives You Through the Holy Spirit

Imagine for a moment that you are on a battlefield. Bombs and gunfire are going off all around you. This "noise" of war lasts day after day. Then, suddenly, it becomes completely quiet. Peace has been reached. The bombing and gunfire have stopped. You now are able to enjoy the quiet sounds of peace. Now imagine that you are your doctor's office. He asked to see you again, after running some teats on you earlier in the week. All week you have been wondering what the results of the test would be. "Do I have cancer?" "Do I have some other type of sickness?" The "noise" of these questions race through your head day after day, until finally you sit down with the doctor and are told that you are healthy and fine. Suddenly your mind becomes quiet. The wondering and the concern are gone. You now you are able to enjoy peace.

Read more: 150524 John 14:26-27

150517 Acts 1:15-26

Text: Acts 1:15-26
Theme: A Model Call Meeting

How did I get here today? I'm not talking about the ten minute drive that took me from Westshore Rd to Highway P to Wisconsin Ave. And I'm not talking about the short step I took into the pulpit a few moments ago. The question I am asking you to consider goes much deeper than that. How did I get to be in this position? Why is there a sign on my office door that says Pastor Pagels? Why am I wearing this white robe? What gives me the right to preach to you? Who gave me the right to announce that your sins are forgiven?

You did. Almost three years ago as a group of Christians at St. Matthew's Evangelical Lutheran Church in Oconomowoc you called me to be your pastor, to preach and teach and administer the sacraments in accordance with God's Word. You are the reason I am standing here right now. But you are not the only reason.

According to the documents I received when I was called to serve at St. Matthew's, you extended to me a divine call. You recognized that God himself led you to call me. The apostle Paul recognized the same thing when he wrote that "it was he (God) who gave some to be apostles, some to be prophets, some to be evangelists, and some to be pastors and teachers" (Ephesians 4:11). And the Lord of the church still works through his church to call church workers today.

Our synod celebrates this cooperative effort between God and God's people about this time every year. Yesterday was Call Day at Martin Luther College, where three members of St. Matthew's received calls to serve in the teaching ministry. And next Thursday will be Call Day at Wisconsin Lutheran Seminary, when thirty men will be called, Lord willing, to serve in the pastoral ministry.

Some of us here have attended a service when these call assignments were announced, but very few, if any of us, have ever been present when the assignments were actually made. Did you ever wonder how that happens? Who does the important work of matching up congregations with called workers, and how do they do it? Do they look for signs? Do they wait for divine revelation? Do they spin a big wheel? Do they throw darts at names on a board?

God's Word doesn't dictate exactly how congregations should proceed when they call their spiritual leaders, but in the first chapter of Acts the Lord gives us an example of how it was done in the early church. Just a few days after Jesus had ascended into heaven, his disciples came together to fill an important ministry position. And this gathering could be called...

A MODEL CALL MEETING

I. They identified the need
II. They determined the qualifications
III. They appealed to the Lord

Read more: 150517 Acts 1:15-26

150510 Acts 9:36-42

Sermon Text: Acts 9:36-42
Sermon Theme: Love One Another

During the episode of A.D. The Bible Continues last Sunday, several times Peter reminded both the followers of Jesus and others that a main teaching of the Lord Jesus is a willingness to forgive others and to show them love. Peter was there in the Upper Room on Maundy Thursday when Jesus said to his disciples: "As the Father has loved me, so have I loved you. Now remain in my love. If you obey my commands, you will remain in my love, just as I have obeyed my Father's commands and remain in his love...My command is this: Love each other as I have loved you. Greater love has no one than this, that he lay down his life for his friends." So today, you and I hear that same encouragement from the loving Savior who laid down his life for you and me, from the risen and living Lord and Savior, when he says to you and he says to me: "This is my command: Love one another."

Read more: 150510 Acts 9:36-42

More Articles...

  1. 150503 Matthew 7:24-27

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Compelled by the love of Christ, St. Matthew’s Evangelical Lutheran Church and School seek to reach out to our families, community and world, using Law and Gospel to make disciples, growing and nurturing them in their Christian faith and life.

 

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Sunday
8:00 A.M. & 10:30 A.M.

9:15 A.M. Bible Study for All Ages

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818 West Wisconsin Avenue
Oconomowoc, WI 53066
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